Northwest Reports

Northwest Reports takes listeners deep into the stories that shape Seattle, Washington state, and the Pacific Northwest, drawing on the enterprising work being done by reporters in the Cascade PBS newsroom. Through conversations with journalists, community members and newsmakers, we showcase personal stories that help us better understand the real-life impacts behind the headlines. Hosted by Maleeha Syed and Sara Bernard.

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Episodes

Wednesday Apr 03, 2024

We spoke with Cynthia Brothers, founder of the project that highlights disappearing institutions and cultures in the city, about losing public spaces.
Coffee shops. Churches. Gyms.   
These are just a few examples of what you might consider your “third place” – a spot you go outside of work and your home to hang out and connect.  
The concept of third places isn’t new, but it has seen renewed interest in recent years as we navigate the social fallout of COVID-19 and increased screen time.  
In this episode of Northwest Reports, host Maleeha Syed chats with Cynthia Brothers of Vanishing Seattle, a media project that highlights disappearing institutions and cultures around the city, about why we’re seeing some of our third places disappear and what it means to lose them.  
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Credits 
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed and Isaac Kaplan-Woolner
Reporter: Maleeha Syed
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
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If you would like to support Cascade PBS, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Cascade PBS.

Wednesday Mar 27, 2024

Lizz Giordano takes us behind the scenes on how dozens of foreign Filipino fishermen wound up stranded on a boat in Grays Harbor.
A fishing company allegedly left two dozen Filipino men stranded at the Westport Marina for months last year, according to the latest reporting from the investigative team at Cascade PBS.  
The men were contracted with McAdam’s Fish, which decided to dock their boats in September amid a slow season. None of the fishermen had a visa, meaning they could be fined if they stepped off the boats at all.  
Consequently, the workers relied on the California-based company for basic needs and to return home. They also didn’t get a majority of their pay in the three months they were living on the vessels.   
In this episode of Northwest Reports, host Maleeha Syed goes behind the scenes with reporter Lizz Giordano to talk about how this story ended up on her radar; what it was like to collaborate on it with reporters Farah Eltohamy and Jaelynn Grisso; and the trip they all took to Westport to see where the fishermen were living.  
Find out more about the investigation into what happened at the Westport Marina here. 
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Credits 
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed and Isaac Kaplan-Woolner
Reporter: Lizz Giordano, Jaelynn Grisso and Farah Eltohamy
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
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If you would like to support Cascade PBS, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Cascade PBS.

Wednesday Mar 20, 2024

The newspaper’s future was in question after founder Sandy Williams died. Reporter Mai Hoang talks about the push to get it up and running again.
For years Black readers in Eastern Washington could rely on The Black Lens, a Spokane-based newspaper, for community news.  
That changed in 2022, when founder Sandy Williams died in a floatplane crash. 
Suddenly the fate of the publication — which had already been on hiatus — was left hanging in the balance. 
In this episode of Northwest Reports, Mai Hoang talks about the push to revive The Black Lens, the publication’s value to community members and the legacy of Sandy Williams.   Read more about the relaunch of The Black Lens here. 
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Credits 
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed and Isaac Kaplan-Woolner
Reporter: Mai Hoang
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
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If you would like to support Cascade PBS, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Cascade PBS.

Wednesday Mar 13, 2024

The two, who met years ago through a peace organization, spoke about their lives before and after Oct. 7 at a Town Hall Seattle event on Friday.
All eyes have been on Gaza since October 7, when Hamas launched a surprise attack on Israel that killed around 1,200 people. Since then, Israel has killed upward of 30,000 Palestinians, according to Gaza’s Health Ministry.  
The war between Israel and Hamas has sparked global outrage, triggered widespread calls for a cease-fire and led some Americans to vote “uncommitted” in the presidential primary – an attempt to get President Joe Biden to take a harsher stance on Israel.  
Still, there have long been efforts to build connections between communities tied to the war. One example is Tomorrow’s Women, an organization dedicated to facilitating dialogue and empowering young Israeli and Palestinian women to work toward peace.  
This episode of Northwest Reports is an edited version of a live event at Town Hall Seattle where Lana Ikelan, a Palestinian journalist, and Noga Bar Oz, a Jewish Israeli musician, shared stories about growing up in a divided world, their work as peacemakers and the ways the war has impacted them. Afterward, the women, who met in 2016 through Tomorrow’s Women, spoke with Northwest Reports co-host Sara Bernard about their relationship, their experiences before and after the war began, and what they continue to hope for.  
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Credits 
Host/Producer: Sara Bernard and Scot Michael 
Reporter: Sara Bernard
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
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If you would like to support Cascade PBS, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Cascade PBS.

Wednesday Mar 06, 2024


The environmental crisis has brought on anxiety, grief and a reluctance to have kids, says UW Bothell professor Jennifer Atkinson. 
 
It’s hard to miss the signs of climate change.   
The ocean’s heating, ice sheets are melting and – in places like Washington – wildfire seasons are getting longer.  
But climate change isn’t just impacting our landscape: It’s also affecting our mental health.  
In this episode of Crosscut Reports, host Maleeha Syed talks with Jennifer Atkinson, an associate teaching professor at the University of Washington Bothell, about the difficult emotions many of us experience with these changes – and what we can do to navigate them.  
To learn more about the impact that climate change is having on our mental health, check out this episode of Human Elements.  
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Credits 
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed and Isaac Kaplan-Woolner
Reporter: Maleeha Syed
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
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If you would like to support Crosscut, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Seattle’s PBS station, KCTS 9.

Wednesday Feb 28, 2024

News editor Donna Blankinship interviewed Steve Hobbs about boosting voter confidence ahead of this year's elections.
Washington’s Secretary of State has a big year ahead.  
The 2024 election is already underway as Washington voters begin to cast their ballots in the presidential primary. Voters have until March 12 to choose among a handful of candidates, including Joe Biden and Donald Trump — the likely nominees for president.  
In mid-February, Crosscut’s news editor, Donna Blankinship, interviewed Washington Secretary Steve Hobbs to hear his thoughts on different election-related matters.  
In this episode of Crosscut Reports, Blankinship speaks with Hobbs about protecting election workers, combating misinformation, ranked-choice voting and more.  
Read more about what Hobbs had to say here. 
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Credits
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed and Sara Bernard
Reporter: Donna Blankinship
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
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If you would like to support Crosscut, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Seattle’s PBS station, KCTS 9.

Wednesday Feb 21, 2024

Reporter Jadenne Radoc Cabahug shares the stories of Black Seattleites who are continuing to work for equity and police accountability.
In May 2020, amid a global pandemic, protests erupted around the United States following the murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis police.  
People marched to demand greater accountability from law enforcement across the country, including in Seattle, where protesters occupied several blocks of Capitol Hill for weeks.  
Crosscut’s emerging journalist fellow, Jadenne Radoc Cabahug, recently reported on four activists who experienced what Seattle was like in the summer of 2020.  
In this episode of Crosscut Reports, host Maleeha Syed speaks with Cabahug about how the people she interviewed remember this moment in Seattle’s history – and how they continue to channel their activism four years later.  
Read more about these four Seattle activists here. 
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Credits
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed and Sara Bernard
Reporter: Jadenne Radoc Cabahug
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
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If you would like to support Crosscut, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Seattle’s PBS station, KCTS 9.

Tuesday Feb 13, 2024

A Bellingham tenant and a housing advocate explain how steep rent increases are hurting state residents, and how HB 2114 could help.
For many tenants across Washington, rent is too high – and it keeps climbing. Right now, landlords face no limit on when or how much they can raise rents.  
HB 2114 would cap rent and fee increases to 7 percent in a 12-month period and prevent landlords from raising rent at all in the first year of a resident’s tenancy. In certain cases, it would also require landlords to give six months’ notice of rent increases.  
In this episode of Crosscut Reports, host Maleeha Syed speaks with Kerri Burnside, a Bellingham resident and supporter of HB 2114, about how sudden and severe rent increases have affected her life and community.  
Then, Michele Thomas from the Washington Low Income Housing Alliance shares details about the bill, the hurdles it faces, and why she believes it’s needed right now. 
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Credits
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed and Sara Bernard
Reporter: Maleeha Syed and Sara Bernard
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
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If you would like to support Crosscut, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Seattle’s PBS station, KCTS 9.

Wednesday Feb 07, 2024

Reporter Brandon Block shares an example of how the state intercepts parental assistance to people who also receive TANF, or welfare.
In 2017, Amy Roark applied for the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program after one of her exes stopped paying his child support.    
She began to receive money through the program, but as these funds started coming in, she stopped getting payments from her exes altogether.   
This was thanks to a Washington policy which intercepts child support to families on TANF. Lawmakers are pushing a bill that would redirect a portion of future payments back to these individuals.   
In this episode, we speak with Crosscut’s Brandon Block about his reporting on Washington’s interception of child support, including why it happens and how it affects families like Amy’s.   
Read more about Washington's practice of intercepting child support payments for TANF recipients – a common practice in most states – here. 
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Credits
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed and Sara Bernard
Reporter: Brandon Block
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
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If you would like to support Crosscut, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Seattle’s PBS station, KCTS 9.

Wednesday Jan 31, 2024

June Guzman and Audrey Baedke offer housing and emotional support through the nonprofit Real Escape from the Sex Trade (REST).
The Seattle area is a known hub for sex trafficking. Some estimates suggest that more than two thousand people could be trafficked in the region every night. 
June Guzman manages the 24/7 hotline and emergency shelter for Real Escape from the Sex Trade, or REST. Audrey Baedke is director of programs at REST. Both Guzman and Baedke work to support survivors through everything from finding transportation and housing assistance to simply answering the phone when a survivor needs someone to talk to.  
In this episode of Crosscut Reports, host Sara Bernard speaks with Guzman and Baedke about their work and what it’s shown them about the urgency of the issue in the region right now.  
But mostly they focus on REST’s 24/7 hotline: what people who call are often looking for; what stories still stick with both Guzman and Baedke; and what a hotline like this, at its core, really means. 
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Credits
Host/Producer: Sara Bernard
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
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If you would like to support Crosscut, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Seattle’s PBS station, KCTS 9.

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