Northwest Reports

Northwest Reports takes listeners deep into the stories that shape Seattle, Washington state, and the Pacific Northwest, drawing on the enterprising work being done by reporters in the Cascade PBS newsroom. Through conversations with journalists, community members and newsmakers, we showcase personal stories that help us better understand the real-life impacts behind the headlines. Hosted by Maleeha Syed and Sara Bernard.

Listen on:

  • Apple Podcasts
  • Podbean App
  • Spotify
  • Amazon Music
  • iHeartRadio
  • PlayerFM
  • Samsung
  • Podchaser

Episodes

4 days ago

Wolfe and his team will focus the five-part docuseries on reefnet fishing and its significance to PNW Indigenous communities.
Cascade PBS has just revealed what’s to come in the third season of Origins. 
The company recently announced Samuel Wolfe as the director chosen to take on the newest season of Origins, a project that awards regional filmmakers $40,000 to create a docuseries on communities they belong to. Previous seasons have focused on refugees in the state and the experiences of growing up Black in Seattle.  
For the third season, Wolfe is going to explore the relationship between Pacific Northwest Indigenous communities and reefnet fishing.  
In this episode of Northwest Reports, host Maleeha Syed talks to Wolfe about how he plans to bring his five-part docuseries to life. Wolfe explains what reefnet fishing is; how his identity impacts his perspective; and what he hopes will come out of the project.  
Read more about the upcoming season of Origins here. 
---
Credits 
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed and Sara Bernard
Guest: Samuel Wolfe
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
---
If you would like to support Cascade PBS, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Cascade PBS. 

Wednesday May 15, 2024

After taking steps to affirm his gender, Torrey Stephenson decided to take a plunge – and became a triathlete in the process.
Torrey Stephenson was born biologically female.  
Over the years he realized that he identifies as a man, and took measures to align with his gender — for example, getting top surgery in 2020.  
As he grew more comfortable in his body, he wanted to try something new: swimming.  
In this episode of Northwest Reports, host Maleeha Syed speaks with Stephenson about how he took the plunge into the sport; why, even though he’s more comfortable with his body, he still has nerves about being trans in Idaho; and how, in just a few months, he went from learning the ropes to competing in a triathlon.   
Read more about Torrey's swimming journey here. 
---
Credits 
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed and Isaac Kaplan-Woolner
Guest: Torrey Stephenson
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
---
If you would like to support Cascade PBS, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Cascade PBS. 

Wednesday May 08, 2024

Cascade PBS anchor Paris Jackson hears from the mayor about key issues facing his administration, such as public safety and Downtown revitalization.
The mayor of Seattle talked all things Emerald City in his recent conversation with Cascade PBS.  
Bruce Harrell was first elected to lead the city in 2021, though he had served as interim mayor in 2017. He also spent years on Seattle’s City Council, including as its president.  
Since taking office, Harrell has faced big-picture questions on public safety and Downtown revitalization.  
In this episode of Northwest Reports, Cascade PBS anchor Paris Jackson sits down with the mayor to talk about some of the topics that are top of mind for Seattle – from policing to the NBA.  
Read more about the conversation with Mayor Harrell here. 
---
Credits 
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed
Reporter: Paris Jackson
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
---
If you would like to support Cascade PBS, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Cascade PBS. 

Wednesday May 01, 2024

Phillips, one of the advocates behind the Cascade PBS project that highlights Black artists in Seattle, discusses its origins — and the new season.
Black Arts Legacies has returned for its third season.  
The project dedicated to documenting the impact and stories of Black artists in Seattle has showcased dozens of people — from dancers and musicians to architects and curators — through written and video profiles, podcast episodes and photography.  
Artists featured this season are being unveiled one at a time each week, with two profiles, on Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence and Tee Dennard, already published.  
In this episode of Northwest Reports, host Maleeha Syed sits down with Vivian Phillips, one of the arts advocates who brought the idea for Black Arts Legacies to Cascade PBS, about the project’s beginnings; what Black Arts Legacies means to her; and this latest season.  
Check out the written and video profiles, photography and podcast episodes for Black Arts Legacies here. 
---
Credits 
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed and Isaac Kaplan-Woolner
Guest: Vivian Phillips 
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
---
If you would like to support Cascade PBS, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Cascade PBS. 

Wednesday Apr 24, 2024

Producer Sara Bernard offers a peek into how the moss is made and teases what lies in wait for listeners in the podcast’s fifth season.
Mossback’s back!  
The beloved video series has returned, and host Knute Berger continues to explore Pacific Northwest history. The fifth season of the companion podcast that Knute co-hosts with Stephen Hegg is back, too.  
A couple of episodes are already out – about deadly avalanches and the effort to cover up a Boeing plant during WWII. There’s a Northwest Reports connection, too: Host Sara Bernard has been producing this latest season of the podcast.  
In this episode of Northwest Reports, host Maleeha Syed catches up with Sara to get a behind-the-scenes peek at how this season is shaping up. The two talk about the insight Sara got into PNW history; her work to bring the show to life through audio; and what it was like to try clam nectar for the podcast.  
Listen to the fifth season of the Mossback podcast here. 
---
Credits 
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed and Isaac Kaplan-Woolner
Reporter: Sara Bernard
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
---
If you would like to support Cascade PBS, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Cascade PBS. 

How Dan Evans Shaped Washington

Wednesday Apr 17, 2024

Wednesday Apr 17, 2024

After Evans' appearance at a Northwest Power and Conservation Council meeting, Venice Buhain and Knute Berger discuss his impact on Washington.
Dan Evans has been a force in Washington for decades.  
The public figure, now 98, has plenty of titles under his belt: Engineer. Washington governor. U.S. Senator.  
In this episode of Northwest Reports, host Maleeha Syed speaks with Cascade PBS associate news editor Venice Buhain about the former three-term governor’s impact on Washington. She recently went to an event attended by Evans, put on by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (which Evans once chaired) at Evergreen State College (where Evans once served as president).    
Syed also speaks with Cascade PBS editor-at-large Knute Berger, who grew up in Washington, about what it was like watching Evans’ legacy develop over the years. 
Read more about the former governor's energy and conservation work here. 
---
Credits 
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed and Isaac Kaplan-Woolner
Reporter: Venice Buhain and Knute Berger 
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
---
If you would like to support Cascade PBS, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Cascade PBS. 

Wednesday Apr 10, 2024

Cascade PBS reporter Mai Hoang talks with the former state legislator about her newest gig, including key issues affecting the city's community members.
This week, Lisa Brown officially passed the 100-day mark in her new role as Spokane’s mayor. 
Brown started her term at the beginning of the year after defeating incumbent Nadine Woodward. She has worked in several different capacities over the years, including as a lawmaker in the State Legislature.  
In this episode of Northwest Reports, Cascade PBS reporter Mai Hoang checks in with Mayor Brown to see how these first months have gone.  
The two touched on major issues impacting Spokane — homelessness, the opioid crisis and recent police shootings.   
Read more about how Brown is approaching her new role as mayor here. 
---
Credits 
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed and Isaac Kaplan-Woolner
Reporter: Mai Hoang
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
---
If you would like to support Cascade PBS, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Cascade PBS. 

Wednesday Apr 03, 2024

We spoke with Cynthia Brothers, founder of the project that highlights disappearing institutions and cultures in the city, about losing public spaces.
Coffee shops. Churches. Gyms.   
These are just a few examples of what you might consider your “third place” – a spot you go outside of work and your home to hang out and connect.  
The concept of third places isn’t new, but it has seen renewed interest in recent years as we navigate the social fallout of COVID-19 and increased screen time.  
In this episode of Northwest Reports, host Maleeha Syed chats with Cynthia Brothers of Vanishing Seattle, a media project that highlights disappearing institutions and cultures around the city, about why we’re seeing some of our third places disappear and what it means to lose them.  
---
Credits 
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed and Isaac Kaplan-Woolner
Reporter: Maleeha Syed
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
---
If you would like to support Cascade PBS, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Cascade PBS.

Wednesday Mar 27, 2024

Lizz Giordano takes us behind the scenes on how dozens of foreign Filipino fishermen wound up stranded on a boat in Grays Harbor.
A fishing company allegedly left two dozen Filipino men stranded at the Westport Marina for months last year, according to the latest reporting from the investigative team at Cascade PBS.  
The men were contracted with McAdam’s Fish, which decided to dock their boats in September amid a slow season. None of the fishermen had a visa, meaning they could be fined if they stepped off the boats at all.  
Consequently, the workers relied on the California-based company for basic needs and to return home. They also didn’t get a majority of their pay in the three months they were living on the vessels.   
In this episode of Northwest Reports, host Maleeha Syed goes behind the scenes with reporter Lizz Giordano to talk about how this story ended up on her radar; what it was like to collaborate on it with reporters Farah Eltohamy and Jaelynn Grisso; and the trip they all took to Westport to see where the fishermen were living.  
Find out more about the investigation into what happened at the Westport Marina here. 
---
Credits 
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed and Isaac Kaplan-Woolner
Reporter: Lizz Giordano, Jaelynn Grisso and Farah Eltohamy
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
---
If you would like to support Cascade PBS, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Cascade PBS.

Wednesday Mar 20, 2024

The newspaper’s future was in question after founder Sandy Williams died. Reporter Mai Hoang talks about the push to get it up and running again.
For years Black readers in Eastern Washington could rely on The Black Lens, a Spokane-based newspaper, for community news.  
That changed in 2022, when founder Sandy Williams died in a floatplane crash. 
Suddenly the fate of the publication — which had already been on hiatus — was left hanging in the balance. 
In this episode of Northwest Reports, Mai Hoang talks about the push to revive The Black Lens, the publication’s value to community members and the legacy of Sandy Williams.   Read more about the relaunch of The Black Lens here. 
---
Credits 
Host/Producer: Maleeha Syed and Isaac Kaplan-Woolner
Reporter: Mai Hoang
Story editor: Ryan Famuliner
Executive producer: Sarah Menzies
---
If you would like to support Cascade PBS, go to crosscut.com/membership. In addition to supporting our events and our daily journalism, members receive complete access to the on-demand programming of Cascade PBS.

Image

Your Title

This is the description area. You can write an introduction or add anything you want to tell your audience. This can help potential listeners better understand and become interested in your podcast. Think about what will motivate them to hit the play button. What is your podcast about? What makes it unique? This is your chance to introduce your podcast and grab their attention.

Copyright 2022 All rights reserved.

Version: 20240320